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DT3 Swing Arm Bushings - Recommended Method for Removal?

  • Mark - DT3
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I have to remove the original nylon bushings from my DT3.  The Yamaha manual doesn't provide a procedure and I haven't been able to find any useful information on line.  I tried tapping them out from the opposite side with a punch, but that didn't work.  I definitely don't want to damage the inside of the tube. If you have any experience successfully removing those bushing, please share your recommendations.  Thanks very much.
14 Sep 2021 13:31 #1

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On a 50 year old bike I'd replace them. If you do, simply split them with a hacksaw blade and pull them out. One cut will let them collapse enough to be removed. I've found everything needed for the multiple restos I've done on ebay...including bushings, shims, bolts, etc... Good luck.
1978 DT400E
1976 DT400C
1973 RT3
1971 RT1B
14 Sep 2021 14:55 #2

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Could try cutting slowly with a hacksaw blade. Think i just attack them with a big screwdriver from the inside but i get a bit rough when needed. Need some sort of expanding tool to get behind it. I've got a homemade one for heavy stuff . Wonder if you flat sided a big washer to slide it through then stand it up a good fit in the arm then drive it against the bush from the far side.
14 Sep 2021 14:56 #3

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  • Dirtboy
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I have a need to do this as well and am interested in the ideas coming about...

15 Sep 2021 01:07 #4

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I need to do this as well. 
15 Sep 2021 06:01 #5

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I have a set of steel rods designed to preload garage door torsional springs.  They are 0.5" in dia and about a 16" long.  They worked well for me knocking out bushings so long as you keep the edge nice and square. 
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15 Sep 2021 09:19 #6

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  • Mark - DT3
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My thanks for your suggestions.  If I understand RT325's suggestion, grinding off two sides of a flat washer would allow it to slide through the first bushing on edge and, with a little "finessing", I should be able to get it to seat against the bushing on the opposite side.  Once the washer is in place, I have the option(s) of using a long hex-head bolt and nut to tap it out (as in the diagram) or, I can use a threaded rod and nut(s) to pull it out from the same side.  Excellent idea.  I haven't found a suitable washer yet, so I may have to make a trip to the hardware store.
If there's any corrosion under the bushing it probably won't budge.  I may end up using Pedalcrazy's idea.  If I'm careful with a hacksaw blade, I may be able to split the bushing and use pliers to roll one side of the bushing into the center.  I'll give it a try tomorrow and let you know how it turns out.
For the others who are also trying to figure this out, I made a sketch that might help.  Please forgive me if the measurements are a little off.

 

Mark 
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Last edit: 15 Sep 2021 15:46 by Mark - DT3. Reason: Image Correction
15 Sep 2021 15:18 #7

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I have used that "grinding washer" method for removing fork seals and it has worked out pretty good, i wish i would have thought of it for the swing arm. As for the swing arm i took a long flat head screw driver and kept tapping around on the inside until i got it out, however i got 1 out and the other ended up cracking.
Luckily those bushings are made new, i had to buy 2 because when i went to put one back in i cracked it! you wanna make sure its nice and clean in there when putting it back together. I find greasing it real good and using a rubber hammer to gently tap it in works great.
15 Sep 2021 20:41 #8

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I used to use brass bushes which we had at work made by some aftermarket brand. Sealed in plastic on a cardboard backing with red writing maybe. If you google away you'll likely find sets with the bush & inner part together. Pretty sure they're the same for lots of models like RD350 & all sorts. I see if you scroll way down the page in the link it shows the inner bush too.
hvccycle.net/bronze-swing-arm-bushings/
15 Sep 2021 21:53 #9

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Heat them up and let them cool a few minutes and knock them both out with a rod and hammer. Lube with grease either replace or reinstall them.

a
YAMA-LAND RESTORATIONS, 818-521-2109 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 1971 CT1-C (BRANDY) 1970 DT1-C (MONICA) 1973 100cc Hodaka Combat Rat (ABBY NORMAL) 1972 AT2M (ARNOLD ZIFFLE)
Last edit: 16 Sep 2021 04:07 by asco.
16 Sep 2021 04:06 #10

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