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TOPIC: Do I want a vintage Enduro?

Do I want a vintage Enduro? 05 Jul 2018 12:44 #11

  • Drembo
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I am not afraid of working on a bike like this. I am retired and have the time and enough money to do it. It is projects like this that make life enjoyable when you are retired. I realize there are things that I would not want to tackle myself. For example, from what I have read, I don't believe I would want to attempt an oil pump rebuild.
What is sobering, however, is Deet's admonition regarding the transitional nature and scarcity of some parts for a 1974. That makes me think twice.
As far as buying a newer bike....meh. I am willing to spend a little extra time and money, and forgo some function, to have something that is vintage, iconic, and cool. As long as I can actually use it. From what I have read and remember, enduros are pretty rugged. On the other hand, these are older bikes and shit happens.
I continue to ponder my options.

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Last Edit: by Drembo.

Do I want a vintage Enduro? 05 Jul 2018 14:25 #12

  • asco
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I was also thinking about asking height and weight as well as age and mechanical ability?

With that being said; unless you are extremely talented or want to spend a lot of time in the garage and not on the trail you might consider the motorcycle with the first letter H.

a

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Do I want a vintage Enduro? 05 Jul 2018 14:29 #13

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What is so unique about the 74 besides the head, gas tank and front brake? Can't 75/76 parts be used instead?

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Do I want a vintage Enduro? 05 Jul 2018 14:41 #14

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I am 61 years old, 5'10", 195 lbs, physically fit. I chop wood, clear brush, seems like i've been digging lots of fence post holes lately, I hike and backpack, but I am not a gym rat/weight lifter. I am a reasonably competent auto mechanic, but have not worked on motorcycles, have never seen the inside of a 2 stroke, although I have been on the inside a a fair share of automobile engines.
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Do I want a vintage Enduro? 05 Jul 2018 16:03 #15

  • run103
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These bikes are fine. they need suspension upgrades before any motor stuff. keep the stator area clean and dry and get a K&N filter for it and if you want a little more free power remove the tool tray under the seat which has the triangular cover over the airbox vent and you will get it.. Ive been riding DT2's and DT 250's and 360's and 400's and never had to walk home yet. On one of my 400's the oil pump mount screws backed out and the pump disengaged and the engine seized and after it cooled I dumped some oil in the gas and got it running and it got me home and actually ran until I took it apart because I was curious. I then honed the cylinder and freed up the rings and put it back together and used it for a year and sold it. The secret to these bikes is clean air filtering and transmission oil and the thing is a tank. In addition you wont even think about jumping anything with these bikes because even if you do land successfully you will give yourself a concussion. Go for it
Doug
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Do I want a vintage Enduro? 05 Jul 2018 16:08 #16

  • MarkT
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I'm partial to the 175's... great trail bike... not so good if you need to ride highways at higher speeds.

IF you decide to go newer... I bought a 2017 Yamaha XT250 last year... got a great deal on a brand new one. Suspension was a little soft but didn't take much to fix. Push button electric start, fuel injected, low seat height, faster than the TW200 but doesn't have the fat tires.

I think the XT250 is very much a "modern" version of the old two strokes we love... lots of fun, reliable as a rock, and with push button starting! ;)

I bought my XT250 for the fuel mileage mostly... around here you need 100+ mile range minimum... 150+ mile range is better. I'm not the best rider and most of the local rides are a "sea of orange" modern bikes at the meetup point... I've been scoffed at... But not so much anymore as when the trails get a bit more technical the little XT shines! Those tall bikes are cool until you need to put a foot down and end up falling over.

As much as I love my old two strokes, I really like the new XT250.
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1963 YG1-T, 1965 MG1-T, Allstate 250, 1970 CT1b, 1971 R5, 1973 AT3MX, 1974 TS400L, 1975 RD350, 1976 DT175C, 1976 Husqvarna 250CR, 1981 DT175G, 1988 DT50, 1990 "Super" DT50, 1991 RT180, 2017 XT250

Do I want a vintage Enduro? 05 Jul 2018 18:26 #17

  • KennyV
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The 250A is a great bike! I have one that I restored 10 years ago. It's the first year of the new design frame. It handels great, very nimble and stable. I haven't had any issues finding parts. Mine is bone stock with 1st over size piston and gets an average 60 mpg.
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Last Edit: by KennyV.

Do I want a vintage Enduro? 05 Jul 2018 19:28 #18

  • Scootern29
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I have an arsenal of bikes, vintage Yamaha YZ, MX, and CZ, Penton, and a modern KTM. Over the years I've owned I don't know how many bikes. My favorite that puts a smile on my face every time I ride it is my 1973 CT3 175. MarkT and I love the little bikes.

If MarkT says his Xt250 is a good bike believe it. He knows how to ride.

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Question authority, think for yourself!

Do I want a vintage Enduro? 05 Jul 2018 19:52 #19

  • Winterwoods
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Drembo wrote: I am 61 years old, 5'10", 195 lbs...

...

I would get back into riding on a good, used modern :


XT225 - Dual Sport
TTR125L - Dirt
TW200 - Dual Sport

Then pick up a vintage of your choice and start
wrenching/learning, on one of those, in order to:


'Have your Cake and to Eat it, too'.





c.winterwoods
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Do I want a vintage Enduro? 05 Jul 2018 20:44 #20

  • DEET
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The XT225's that I have ridden have been dogs.

Kenny has experience with the 1974 DT250. You can trust his opinion.

To clarify, if I was looking at restoring a basket case enduro, I wouldn't pick the 1974 250 or 360. However, if you can get one that is working well, there is no reason to avoid it.
It only matters if you have to find some of those hard to find parts.

It would be a great idea to have a modern one and an old two stroke.
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